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Top 2 Money Transfer Providers for France to Brazil

Provider Amount Received Fee Exchange Rate Speed
Moneycorp Moneycorp BRL R$61,519.85 No Fee 6.152 1-3 days more...
Currency Solutions Currency Solutions BRL R$62,001.64 No Fee 6.2002 1-3 days more...
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FRANCE
Being a member of the single currency eurozone, France does not apply currency controls and is completely open to foreign exchange Read More
BRAZIL
Sending money to Brazil is not restricted and can be easily done Read More
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Send money from France to Brazil

Top 2 Money Transfer Providers

Latest prices for transferring money from France to Brazil
Exchange Rates as of 3 December 2020, 21:30

Moneycorp

Est. 1979

One-off payments | Regular payments | Great rates | Safeguarded customer funds

More InfoLess Info
Amount Received
BRL R$61,519.85
EUR €119.77
saved vs. banks

Currency Solutions

Est. 2003

Currency exchange specialists ranking No.1 on Trustpilot for the past two years

More InfoLess Info
Amount Received
BRL R$62,001.64
EUR €196.77
saved vs. banks

How to Transfer Money from France to Brazil

What is in this guide

France to Brazil Guide

Summary

France and Brazil created a formal strategic alliance in 2008, and today both countries remain committed to bilateral relations, with working groups formed in technological innovation, renewable energies, nuclear energies, and defense technologies to help foster existing political and trade alliances. The countries have established a number of agreements for trade, foreign direct investment, and educational opportunities. Currently, there are no restrictions on sending money between the countries, and it is easy to transfer money from France to Brazil.

Visas, work permits and residency

To visit Brazil, all non-citizens must have a passport that is valid for at least six months after their date of arrival in the country. For business or tourist visits of up to 90 days, French citizens are not required to have a visa to travel within Brazil. For stays of longer than 90 days, French citizens must apply for the appropriate work or travel visa through a local Brazilian consulate or embassy. A permanent resident visa must be applied for if planning to establish residency and live permanently in Brazil.

Buying property in Brazil

Buying real estate in Brazil is considered a good investment and is generally open, without restrictions, to foreign investors. The Brazilian government’s regulations stipulate that all foreign purchasers of Brazilian property must show a valid passport and an individual taxpayer’s number (the cadastro de pessoa fisica, CPF). The taxpayer’s number is issued by the Brazilian treasury department and is mandatory for any real estate purchase. Married purchasers will also need to supply their spouse’s CPF. To complete the purchase, foreign buyers must also provide proof of solvency from the Brazilian Tax Office. The proof of solvency is only granted once the purchaser’s CPF number has been granted. After the CPF number has been assigned and submitted with all required paperwork, French citizens will want to look into setting up an international money transfer to fund their purchase.

The only restrictions for French citizens who wish to purchase property in Brazil are related to purchasing property that borders other countries. Currently, no foreigners may purchase property in Brazil that is on the seashore or that is within 150 kilometers of international borders, without first obtaining special government authorization. Foreigners also may not purchase property that is considered rural. It is advisable to find a real estate attorney and agent that are familiar with Brazilian real estate law and the language to guide you throughout the process.

Taxation

French citizens living abroad must report any income earned worldwide, and are required to file tax forms with the French government declaring any earnings they make while residing in Brazil. French citizens must pay taxes on this income, although the tax treaty between the two countries allows French citizens to receive credit via a foreign income tax offset for any taxes they pay in Brazil, helping them to avoid double taxation.

Voting

In 2012, it became legal for French citizens and residents to vote in local municipal elections and European parliamentary elections while living abroad. French citizens living in Brazil are not permitted to vote in Brazilian elections. Voting is compulsory in Brazil, but only for Brazilian citizens. For French citizens who wish to vote remotely in their country’s parliamentary elections, they must first register with the local French consulate where they are living before they are permitted to vote from abroad.

French citizens studying in Brazil

The Brazilian school system includes a number of international schools available to non-residents. Typically, the language spoken at international schools is either English, German, or Japanese. There are French-speaking schools in Brazil, however. A listing of international schools can be found at the Good Schools Guide International website. For French citizens who wish to pursue higher education in Brazil, there are a number of programs and educational opportunities established by the French and Brazilian governments.

Healthcare

Brazil is one of the leading medical tourism destinations in South America and there are a number of top-notch healthcare facilities within the country. Currently, there is no reciprocal healthcare agreement between Brazil and France. French citizens who plan to visit Brazil on a temporary basis for work or travel are strongly advised to take out travel insurance to cover any unexpected medical costs.

While Brazilian citizens and foreign residents are eligible to take part in the country’s government-funded healthcare services, foreigners should rely on private insurance or employer-provided insurance when in Brazil, as they are not eligible for these public services.

Importing from France to Brazil

Brazil is the largest recipient of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Latin America and, according to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the sixth largest recipient in the world for money transfers and FDI flows in 2013. International trade and investing between France and Brazil is robust, and the two countries belong to a number of international committees to encourage continuing trade and investment opportunities, as well as maintaining efforts to work together to implement global policy initiatives in key areas such as technological development, energy, and international human rights.

Summary

France and Brazil created a formal strategic alliance in 2008, and today both countries remain committed to bilateral relations, with working groups formed in technological innovation, renewable energies, nuclear energies, and defense technologies to help foster existing political and trade alliances. The countries have established a number of agreements for trade, foreign direct investment, and educational opportunities. Currently, there are no restrictions on sending money between the countries, and it is easy to transfer money from France to Brazil.

Visas, work permits and residency

To visit Brazil, all non-citizens must have a passport that is valid for at least six months after their date of arrival in the country. For business or tourist visits of up to 90 days, French citizens are not required to have a visa to travel within Brazil. For stays of longer than 90 days, French citizens must apply for the appropriate work or travel visa through a local Brazilian consulate or embassy. A permanent resident visa must be applied for if planning to establish residency and live permanently in Brazil.

Buying property in Brazil

Buying real estate in Brazil is considered a good investment and is generally open, without restrictions, to foreign investors. The Brazilian government’s regulations stipulate that all foreign purchasers of Brazilian property must show a valid passport and an individual taxpayer’s number (the cadastro de pessoa fisica, CPF). The taxpayer’s number is issued by the Brazilian treasury department and is mandatory for any real estate purchase. Married purchasers will also need to supply their spouse’s CPF. To complete the purchase, foreign buyers must also provide proof of solvency from the Brazilian Tax Office. The proof of solvency is only granted once the purchaser’s CPF number has been granted. After the CPF number has been assigned and submitted with all required paperwork, French citizens will want to look into setting up an international money transfer to fund their purchase.

The only restrictions for French citizens who wish to purchase property in Brazil are related to purchasing property that borders other countries. Currently, no foreigners may purchase property in Brazil that is on the seashore or that is within 150 kilometers of international borders, without first obtaining special government authorization. Foreigners also may not purchase property that is considered rural. It is advisable to find a real estate attorney and agent that are familiar with Brazilian real estate law and the language to guide you throughout the process.

Taxation

French citizens living abroad must report any income earned worldwide, and are required to file tax forms with the French government declaring any earnings they make while residing in Brazil. French citizens must pay taxes on this income, although the tax treaty between the two countries allows French citizens to receive credit via a foreign income tax offset for any taxes they pay in Brazil, helping them to avoid double taxation.

Voting

In 2012, it became legal for French citizens and residents to vote in local municipal elections and European parliamentary elections while living abroad. French citizens living in Brazil are not permitted to vote in Brazilian elections. Voting is compulsory in Brazil, but only for Brazilian citizens. For French citizens who wish to vote remotely in their country’s parliamentary elections, they must first register with the local French consulate where they are living before they are permitted to vote from abroad.

French citizens studying in Brazil

The Brazilian school system includes a number of international schools available to non-residents. Typically, the language spoken at international schools is either English, German, or Japanese. There are French-speaking schools in Brazil, however. A listing of international schools can be found at the Good Schools Guide International website. For French citizens who wish to pursue higher education in Brazil, there are a number of programs and educational opportunities established by the French and Brazilian governments.

Healthcare

Brazil is one of the leading medical tourism destinations in South America and there are a number of top-notch healthcare facilities within the country. Currently, there is no reciprocal healthcare agreement between Brazil and France. French citizens who plan to visit Brazil on a temporary basis for work or travel are strongly advised to take out travel insurance to cover any unexpected medical costs.

While Brazilian citizens and foreign residents are eligible to take part in the country’s government-funded healthcare services, foreigners should rely on private insurance or employer-provided insurance when in Brazil, as they are not eligible for these public services.

Importing from France to Brazil

Brazil is the largest recipient of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Latin America and, according to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the sixth largest recipient in the world for money transfers and FDI flows in 2013. International trade and investing between France and Brazil is robust, and the two countries belong to a number of international committees to encourage continuing trade and investment opportunities, as well as maintaining efforts to work together to implement global policy initiatives in key areas such as technological development, energy, and international human rights.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are the money transfer companies shown above safe to use?

Yes, all the companies are safe and fully-regulated money transfer services. Each are authorised and regulated by the relevant authority such as the Financial Conduct Authority(FCA) in the UK, FinCEN in the US, FinTRAC in Canada or ASIC in Australia.

How long does an international money transfer take?

The speed of delivery will depend on where the money is being from and to and how you are sending and receiving the money. Transfers sent using bank to bank transfers can depend take anywhere from minutes to days and you should check the time estimates from the relevant provider. Debit and credit card payments sometimes allow for faster transfers for smaller amounts.

How do I use FXcompared?

First review the comparison results (such as for a table above) for a given amount of money sending from France to Brazil. Then select a provider based on factors such as price, speed, their rating and click the green button to be taken to their website. From there, you can register and sign up for an account. Once you have done that and the provider has verified your identity to ensure the money can be send safely, you will be ready to transfer money.

What payments methods can I use to send money overseas?

The results shown above are typically for bank to bank transfers. It is possible via some providers to pay in your funds for the transfer via cash, debit or credit cards as well but this is usually reserved for smaller amounts. Some providers also give you different options for how the money will be received - to a bank account (most common), to a debit card, to cash or to a digital or mobile wallet.

What if the price shown above isn’t exactly what I am offered when I try to transfer money?

There can be a number of reasons why the final price you are offered may be different to that shown in the table above. Exchange rates between two currencies change all the time and is the most common reason. Additionally, some providers offer different pricing depending what method you are using to send funds or how the funds will be received. Others may offer you a premium service for faster payments. In some cases FXcompared has a special rate with a provider and this is reserved for first time customers who sign up to the provider starting from FXcompared’s website. As prices do change often, be sure to confirm the total cost with the provider before transferring money.

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All the providers listed are regulated by the relevant authority (e.g. the FCA in the UK, FinCEN in the US, ASIC in Australia) and have been vetted by FXcompared.

FXcompared.com is an fx money comparison site for international money transfer and to compare rates from currency brokers for sending money abroad. The website and the information provided is for informational purposes only and does not constitute an offer, solicitation or advice on any financial service or transaction. None of the information presented is intended to form the basis for any investment decision, and no specific recommendations are intended.  FXC Group Ltd and FX Compared Ltd does not provide any guarantees of any data from third parties listed on this website. FX compared Ltd expressly disclaims any and all responsibility for any direct or consequential loss or damage of any kind whatsoever arising directly or indirectly from (i) any error, omission or inaccuracy in any such information or (ii) any action resulting therefrom.