Mesh to pair up with Visa for new product offer

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Daniel Webber
Daniel Webber
Founder & CEO
Daniel is Founder and CEO of FXcompared and has 18 years of experience in the international finance world focusing on cross-border payments, technology and the property sectors. Daniel is widely… Read more
  • Mesh, which is based in New York, will work alongside Visa to simplify the process of cross border payments
  • The new collaboration will help B2B customers with payment receivables tracking, visibility and much more
  • “By working together with Visa as our preferred partner, we are taking the complexity out of payments”, said a spokesperson for Mesh

A leading American payments platform has announced it will work alongside Visa to provide new products and services for cross border payments customers.

Mesh said that it would launch the collaboration as a way of speeding up the international money transfer process for business.

The B2B offer will see Mesh provide virtual, pre-paid commercial bank cards – powered by Visa – to customers around the world.

As part of the new collaboration, customers will be able to access a wide range of benefits.

This will primarily be speed but will also include added transparency.

It will be easier for customers to identify which payment relates to which invoice too.

There will be a concerted move towards helping firms anticipate the arrival of payments and plan effectively through offering a money arrival time, as well as increased information about the costs of the transaction.

In a statement, Oded Zehavi – who is the co-founder and CEO of Mesh – said that Visa was a “preferred partner” for the firm.

“SMBs are going global faster than ever, which is fueling innovation in this space”, he said.

“By working together with Visa as our preferred partner, we are taking the complexity out of payments”, he said.

“With Visa’s global reach and our advanced technology platform, we are enabling payment providers and merchant acquirers to offer all types of businesses globally a frictionless B2B payment option that brings balance into commercial payments”, he added.

For Visa, Taira Hall – who is the head of B2B partnerships at the firm – said that the current age was “transformational” when it came to the B2B international money transfer sector.

“This is a transformational time in the cross-border B2B payments industry. Mesh delivers a unique solution that simplifies the cross-border payments experience for businesses needing to pay their global suppliers”, she said.

Mesh is a well-known brand in the sector and is based in New York City.

It describes itself as offering a three-step process for receiving payments – including payment requests, approval of requests and payout.

It also offers a range of insights into its customer offer.

In terms of security, for example, it emphasises its focus on “single-use virtual cards which can only be used once and generates a new card number for each transaction”.

It also describes itself as being at the forefront of anti-fraud provision.

“You are covered by the most advanced fraud prevention techniques and data privacy controls”, it says.

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